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THE TIN WOODMAN, CAPTAIN FYTER, AND CHOPFYT: L. FRANK BAUM’S PORTRAYAL OF BODY IMAGE AND PROSTHESES IN THE WAKE OF WORLD WAR I

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dc.contributor.author Gethins, Marie
dc.date.accessioned 2022-06-30T09:44:34Z
dc.date.available 2022-06-30T09:44:34Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.citation Gethins, M. (2020). The Tin Woodman, Captain Fyter, and Chopfyt: L. Frank Baum’s portrayal of body image and prostheses in the wake of World War I. Dialogue: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Popular Culture and Pedagogy, 7(1). http://journaldialogue.org/issues/v7-issue-1/the-tin-woodman-captain-fyter-and-chopfyt-l-frank-baums-portrayal-of-body-image-and-prostheses-in-the-wake-of-world-war-i/ en_US
dc.identifier.issn 2378-2331
dc.identifier.uri http://journaldialogue.org/issues/v7-issue-1/the-tin-woodman-captain-fyter-and-chopfyt-l-frank-baums-portrayal-of-body-image-and-prostheses-in-the-wake-of-world-war-i/
dc.identifier.uri http://nur.nu.edu.kz/handle/123456789/6353
dc.description.abstract Nineteenth and early twentieth-century children’s literature frequently depicts characters with disabilities as flat stereotypes — villains or saintly invalids. L. Frank Baum’s The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918) provides a sharp contrast to these typical portrayals, as well as contemporary “socio-cultural” beliefs on physical normalcy and sense of self. Written as the U.S. entered World War I and details of trench warfare reached the home-front, it presents an interesting exploration of society’s response to physical disability and prostheses. In addition, it highlights the psychological devastation associated with body changes. During Baum’s formative years, disabled Civil War veterans returned to New York state in large numbers. Initially respected for their service and their subsequent loss, Civil War veterans gradually found themselves the subject of resentment across much of the United States. Many cities passed ordinances prohibiting the disabled from frequenting public areas to avoid “disturbing” the populace. Baum’s portrayal of three characters contrasts with contemporary “socio-cultural” mores. In The Tin Woodman of Oz, the Tin Woodman and Captain Fyter, who progressively dismembered themselves and replaced body parts with tin prostheses, are shown in a positive light. When these “tin twins” Captain Fyter and the Tin Woodman encounter Chopfyt — a man assembled from a combination of their flesh body parts — the three characters reflect on what constitutes physical normalcy, as well as the value and beauty of prostheses. Through Chopfyt, the psychological effects of limb loss and the concept of usefulness come to the fore. This paper considers the influences the Civil War and World War I amputees may have played on Baum’s writing of The Tin Woodman of Oz and what cultural lessons underlie his characterizations of prostheses, physical normalcy, and what constitutes a sense of self. Keywords: Disability, prostheses, amputee, Oz, World War 1, physical normalcy en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Dialogue: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Popular Culture and Pedagogy en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Dialogue: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Popular Culture and Pedagogy;Volume 7, Issue 1 — Bodies in Motion: Challenging Imagery, Tradition, and Teaching
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/ *
dc.subject Type of access: Open Access en_US
dc.title THE TIN WOODMAN, CAPTAIN FYTER, AND CHOPFYT: L. FRANK BAUM’S PORTRAYAL OF BODY IMAGE AND PROSTHESES IN THE WAKE OF WORLD WAR I en_US
dc.type Article en_US
workflow.import.source science


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